Definitions

  • Administrative fees: fees that help pay all the staff who keep programs running, plus expenses like paper, copiers, room rental, and other costs.
  • Advisor: A staff person who is an expert in knowing about courses on campus.  Adivsors help students pick the right classes.
  • Audit: When students audit a class, they still do all the work and get a grade, but they don’t earn any credits and can’t use the course to get a degree.  Usually tuition is much cheaper, too.
  • Circle of Support: One type of support for people with disabilities, where a group of people who know you help you set goals, work toward them, make decisions, and problem-solve.  Your opinions and what you want is always the most important thing – part of “person-centered planning.”  See the resources list to learn more.  If you come to SU from another state, you should have a group of people who can help support you in Syracuse, because (like all students) you will be making a lot of decisions, growing, learning, and becoming more independent.  It’s important for all students at SU to have support.
  • Credits: Students at SU who want a bachelor’s degree have to take courses, and each course is worth a certain number of credits.  Once they have enough credits earned, then they get a degree.  Students who audit through InclusiveU do not earn credits, but they also pay less in tuition.  Some InclusiveU students realize they can enroll in degree programs, and we help them do that.
  • CSS Plans:  Consolidated Supports and Services Plans (CSS Plans) are a way for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to decide how they want to live in the community, work, or take college classes.  CSS Plans are part of using Medicaid waivers (see “Medicaid waiver” definition for more details).  Other states may use different terms for CSS Plans.
  • Degree programs: If you are trying to get a Bachelor’s degree, then people say you are “in a degree program” or that you are a “degree-seeking student.”
  • Dependents/dependent tuition benefits: When people work at SU, one of their benefits (in addition to retirement funds, health insurance, etc.) is that their children can take classes for free.  Children are “dependents” on their parents’ taxes, so the free tuition is called “dependent tuition benefits.”
  • Disability accommodations: services and supports you need because you have a disability.  Common accommodations are note-taking, needing readings in digital format so your computer can read them, or extra time to take tests.  Universities are not responsible for buying you equipment you need or paying for any personal supports, like aides.  Universities also don’t have to make any major modifications to a course, so most of the time students in InclusiveU do the same work as other students; if you need changes to a course (like a different assignment), we figure these out on a case-by-case basis with you, InclusiveU staff, and the professors.
  • Disability documentation: Medical documents or letters from medical professionals explaining your disability and how it affects you in different situations at home, classes, or work.
  • Dorms: Big buildings where students live on campus, usually sharing rooms and bathrooms.  Every dorm also usually has an eating area and laundry facilities.
  • Extension courses: College courses for people going to college part-time.
  • Faculty: Another word for professors.
  • Graduation ceremonies: The end-of-the-year celebration where all the students and professors put on caps and long robes and celebrate all the students who are graduating.  SU has one big graduation ceremony for everyone (called “commencement”) and each school at SU (University College, the School of Education, the College of Law) has a ceremony just for their students.
  • High school transcript: A document from your high school showing all the grades you got in your high school classes, and which classes you took.
  • Independent living skills courses: Courses that focus on skills people need for daily life, like taking the bus, making change, using maps, or cooking.
  • Internships: Short jobs where students can learn how to do a certain kind of job.  Most internships are not paid – people do them to get the work experience.
  • Letters of recommendation: Letters from people who know you, who can recommend you for something and talk about your skills and experiences.
  • Medicaid waivers: Most people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive support from Medicaid.  A new process allows Medicaid users to ask for waivers (it’s called something different in each state).  Medicaid used to send money to agencies and agencies spent the money.  Medicaid waivers let individuals decide how they want to spend money, so they have more control.  The money still goes through an agency, but individuals help develop their own budgets.  This means Medicaid waivers can be used to pay for tuition and college-related expenses.
  • Non-degree courses: College courses for people who are not planning to earn a college degree, like an associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree.  Many introductory courses are open to students whether or not they are going to get a degree in the future.
  • Open house: A time you can come and visit for as much time as you want – a good time to ask questions and meet people.
  • Peers: People in your age groups.  When you become a student at SU, the undergraduate students will be your peers because they are about the same age and taking the same kinds of classes.
  • Prospective student: Someone who isn’t a student right now, but wants to become a student.
  • Prospective student weekend: A weekend each year when people visit SU to take tours and see the campus, because they are thinking about becoming students.
  • Register/registration: When you register for classes, you tell the university which classes you will take. You sign up for courses.
  • Remitted tuition: When an employee at SU wants to take classes, they don’t have to pay as much tuition as everyone else.  This is called “remitted” tuition.
  • Résumé: a document that explains how much education and work experience you have.  Before getting a job, you will create a résumé.
  • Semester: SU has two semesters of classes: fall and spring.  Each one is about 15 weeks long.  There are also classes during the summer, but most students work during the summer or take a vacation.  Every semester you will start new classes.
  • Sliding scale: When things are charged on a sliding scale, that means some people pay the whole cost, and other people don’t have to pay anything.  The fees are adjusted, depending on people’s ability to pay.
  • Student fees: All colleges have student fees.  The money from student fees helps pay for all the things students do outside of classes, like student activities, going to the health center, using the gym and rec centers, and much more.  InclusiveU students are auditing so they pay a reduced student fee.
  • SU Conduct Code: SU has a Conduct Code that all students must follow, including students in InclusiveU.  You must respect other people and SU property, and follow rules about not cheating.  The resource list has a link to the SU Conduct Code.
  • Tuition: The amount of money people pay SU to take their classes.  Tuition helps pay the professors, all the staff who support students, the people who take care of SU and keep it working, student activities, and much more.
  • Undergraduate: Undergraduates are people who are trying to get a Bachelor’s degree, which usually takes about four years.  Undergraduate courses are classes for people trying to get a Bachelor’s degree.  Once you get a Bachelor’s degree, you can take advanced courses called “graduate” courses and you become a graduate student.  InclusiveU students take undergraduate courses.
  • Vocational: Related to work.  So “vocational goals” are goals about what you want to do in a job or career someday.